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Access to clean water
11 Apr

Access to clean water

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IMPROVES...

 Education

When students are freed from gathering water, they return to class. With proper and safe latrines, girls stay in school through their teenage years.

Health

Safe water, clean hands, healthy bodies. Time lost to sickness is reduced and people can get back to the work of lifting themselves out of poverty.

Hunger

Access to water leads to food security. With less crop loss, hunger is reduced. Schools can feed students with gardens, reducing costs.

Poverty

Access to water can break the cycle of poverty. The communities we serve are ready to grow. We can't wait to see how they choose to do it.

Improving Health in Africa
11 Apr

Improving Health in Africa

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..begins with access to safe Water

Did you know that half of the world's hospital beds are filled with people suffering from a water-related disease? In developing countries, about 80% of illnesses are linked to poor water and sanitation conditions. 1 out of every 5 deaths under the age of 5 worldwide is due to a water-related disease. Clean and safe water is essential to healthy living.

Tiny worms and bacteria live in water naturally. Most of the bacteria are pretty harmless. But some of them can cause devastating disease in humans. And since they can't be seen, they can't be avoided.

Every glass of dirty water is a potential killer.

Most of these waterborne diseases aren't found in developed countries because of the sophisticated water systems that filter and chlorinate water to eliminate all disease carrying organisims. But typhoid fever, cholera and many other diseases still run rampant in the developing parts of the world.

Source: Water Project

Water and Young Children
11 Apr

Water and Young Children

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Infants and young children are especially susceptible to diseases because their immune systems are experiencing everything for the first time. Even in developed countries, lots of moms boil water before giving it to their children - just to be doubly safe. In poor countries, the fuel for the fire can be so expensive that mothers can't afford to boil water and cook food. At The Water Project, we're working with local communities to provide access to safe water at schools and where children live. A water project, like a new well, can transform a child's life.

Water unlocks potential by helping kids stay healthy so they can stay in school.

source:https://thewaterproject.org

Poor health leads to poor productivity.
11 Apr

Poor health leads to poor productivity.

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The sickness caused by dirty water saps people's energy to do much of anything. If you've ever had food poisoning, you know how horrible it can be. Students who suffer from waterborne illness can't stay in class. They miss out on the chance to learn and the cycle of poverty continues. That and when one person is sick, someone else has to take care of them, which means that the second person can't work either. If the sick person needs medicine, that money can't be used for other things, like food or school supplies.

Rural dwellers and the urban poor feel the lack of safe water and proper sanitation in the developing world the most. With few medical resources at their disposal, the poor are particularly vulnerable to chronic illnesses that hinder their productivity, making the escape from poverty even more difficult.

11 Facts About Water in the Developing World
11 Apr

11 Facts About Water in the Developing World

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  1. 884 million people in the world lack access to safe water supplies.
  2. More than 840,000 people die each year from water-related disease.
  3. Almost 2 in 3 people who need safe drinking water survive on less than $2 a day.
  4. In many developing countries, millions of women spend several hours a day collecting water from distant, often polluted sources.
  5. Every minute a child dies of a water-related disease.
  6. Diarrhea caused by inadequate drinking water, sanitation, and hand hygiene kills an estimated 842,000 people every year globally, or approximately 2,300 people per day.
  7. More than 1/2 of all primary schools in developing countries don't have adequate water facilities and nearly 2/3 lack adequate sanitation.
  8. Clean water is one aspect of improving sustainable food production in order to reduce poverty and hunger.
  9. More than 80% of sewage in developing countries is discharged untreated, polluting rivers, lakes and coastal areas.
  10. By 2025, 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions with absolute water scarcity, and two-thirds of the world's population could be living under water stressed conditions.
  11. Every $1 spent on water and sanitation generates $8 as a result of saved time, increased productivity and reduced health care costs.

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